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    About NDRI

    A Statistics Section was first formed at NDRI in 1960, which was later converted into the Division of Dairy Economics, Statistics and Management (DES&M) in 1972. Dr. R.K. Patel joined as the first Head of the division. He steered the division

     

    A Statistics Section was first formed at NDRI in 1960, which was later converted into the Division of Dairy Economics, Statistics and Management (DES&M) in 1972. Dr. R.K. Patel joined as the first Head of the division. He steered the division

    Dr. B. S. Chandel, HOD

    Welcome to the website of the Division of Dairy Economics, Statistics and Management. The Division occupies central place location-wise and academically in the national institution of higher learning in the field of dairying. The Division is an amalgamation of three disciplines, that is, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Statistics and Computer Application. We offer post-graduate programs at Master and Doctoral levels in Agricultural Economics. Our faculty members teach variety of courses at under-graduate level also, that is, B. Tech. (DT). The issues of economics and statistics are central to all research studies in the institute and our Division addresses them. The alumni of the division are well placed in academia, banking and the development sector. The Division provides unique opportunities for aspiring post-graduate students by offering an ambient academic environment, professional learning and analytical skills.

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    Research

    The Division has strong experience and capacity to conduct research in inter-disciplines of dairy economics, statistics and management. In the past, followings have been the broad areas of research:

    1. Economics of dairy production, processing and marketing
    2. Technology impact assessment and project appraisal of dairy development program
    3. Climate Change, risk and vulnerability issues in dairy development
    4. Demand, supply and price analysis of dairy products
    5. Globalization and trade in dairy
    6. Statistical studies and application of soft-computing in decision support system

    The research in the Division is conducted by the learned faculty by proposing research projects on current issues and by guiding the post-graduate students in their research for dissertation. The funding of research projects proposed by the faculty may be internal (Institutional) or external (sponsored by agencies other than ICAR). With following outside agencies, the Division has developed strong academic and research linkage.

    1. National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD)
    2. National Dairy Development Board (NDDB)
    3. National Innovations in Climate Resilient Agriculture (NICRA)
    4. Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying, GoI, New Delhi
    5. National Institute of Agriculture Marketing (NIAM)
    6. National Institute of Agricultural Economics and Policy Research (NIAP)
    7. Dr V. Kurien Centre of Excellence, Institute of Rural Management, Anand
    8. International Food Policy and Research Institute, (IFPRI), South Asia Centre, New Delhi
    9. International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), South Asia Office, New Delhi
    10. State Agriculture Universities
    11. International Farm Comparison Network (IFCN)
    12. National Statistical Office (NSO), Ministry of Statistics & Programme Implementation

    The research conducted by students contributes significantly in overall research outcome of the Division. The students of both master and doctoral degree are involved in research on important topics decided in consultation with faculty, as partial fulfillment of their degree program and results are submitted in the form of thesis. Some of the broad topics of students’ research have been as mentioned below.

    Master Research

    • Vulnerability of dairy farmers to risk and climate change
    • Estimating cost of milk production and processing
    • Consumption pattern and consumer preferences for milk and milk products (MMPs)
    • Role of various institutions (SHGs, Cooperatives, finance and insurance) in dairy development

    Doctoral Research

    • Impact evaluation of Anionic Mineral Mixture Supplementation on milk production and the milk fever
    • Effect of public research Investment on livestock sector productivity
    • Economic losses due to clinical mastitis and reproductive disorders
    • Estimation of subsidy in crop and livestock sector
    • Dynamics of milk production and sustainability assessment of commercial dairy farms
    • Production risk and adaptation strategies for climate change in dairy farm households

    In order to conduct research, the modern techniques and models are used. The Division has pan-India mandate and hence, the research studies address issues of dairy production, processing and marketing across state. The studies are also taken to analyze international trade and developments in the field of dairying.

    Outcome of the research is published in the form of research articles in national and international referred research journals, popular articles, book chapters and bulletins. Some of the recent publications of the Division in referred journals are as following:

    Publications

    • Bhandari G. and Chandel, B.S. (2020) Socio-economic determinants of breed choice- A case of Sahiwal vs. crossbred in India. Int. J. Curr. Microbiol. App. Sci. 9(1): 1427-1437.
    • Kumari, B., Chandel, B.S. and Lal, P. (2020) Profit efficiency among dairy farms in the Eastern region of India. Indian Journal of Economics and Development 10(1): 97-103.
    • Kathayat B.; Lal P. and Dixit A.K. (2020) Has the consumption pattern changed? An overview of livestock products. Indian Journal of Economics and Development 16(2s): 312-317.
    • Cariappa A.G. and Chandel, B.S. (2020) Why are the pepper prices declining? An analysis of changing production and trade scenario in India. Journal of Plantation Crops 48(1): 60-69.
    • Thakur A.; Dixit A.K. and Ravishankara K.M. (2020) Economic analysis of informal dairy processing units in Karnal district of Haryana.  Indian J. Dairy Sci. 73(2): 151-154.
    • Kumari B.; Chandel B.S., Malhotra R., Kumari T. and Lal P. (2020) Profit efficiency of women dairy farmers in Begusrai district of Bihar. Indian Journal of Economics and Development 16(2s): 472-476.
    • Acharya K.K. and Malhotra, R. (2020) Economic analysis of milk production in peri-urban dairy farms of Odisha. Indian J. Dairy Sci. 73(2): 155-159.
    • Balaganesh G.; Malhotra R., Sendhil R., Sirohi S., Maiti S., Ponnusamy K. and Sharma A.K. (2020) Development of composite vulnerability index and district level mapping of climate change induced draught in Tamilnadu. Ecological indicators 113: 1-11.
    • Singh, Shyam Prakash and Chandel, B.S. (2020) Constraints faced by the dairy farmers and agencies involved in livestock insurance in Haryana, India. Agricultural Science Digest 40(1): 95-99.
    • Chandel, B.S.; Dixit, A.K.; Singh, Ajmer and Devi, Asha (2020) Economic analysis of the impact of COVID-19 lockdown on Indian Dairy Sector. Agricultural Situation in India, LXXVII(08): 21-27
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    Faculty

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    Current Research Project

    Sr. No. Project Title Name of PI Duration Funding agency
     1 Estimation of life time economics of selected breeds of dairy animals in field conditions Dr B.S.Chandel 2020-2022 Institute
     2 Impact Assessment of Selected technologies of NDRI Dr A.K. Dixit 2020-2023 Institute
     3 Identification of indigenous milch breeds of cattle through computer vision Dr A.P. Ruhil 2020-2022 Institute
     4 Impact Assessment of COVID-19 pandemic on Indian Dairy Sector Dr Gunjan Bhandari 2020-2023 Institute
     5 ICAR-NIAP Project on Policy Imperatives for Promoting Value Chains in Agricultural Commodities in India with special reference to Dairy Start-ups Dr A.K. Dixit 2018-21 ICAR Network Project
     6 Evaluation and Impact of Dairy Farmer Collectives in Gujarat: A Study in Saurashtra and Kutchh Regions Dr Ravinder Malhotra 2019-21 VKCoE (IRMA) Funded
     7 Estimation of production and utilization patter of milk and milk products Dr Ajmer Singh 2019-22 NSO Consultancy Project
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    History

    A Statistics Section was first formed at NDRI in 1960, which was later converted into the Division of Dairy Economics, Statistics and Management (DES&M) in 1972. Dr. R.K. Patel joined as the first Head of the division. He steered the division to expand its research and teaching activities and the discipline of Dairy Economics got real impetus under his able leadership. Apart from conducting research on various economic aspects of dairy sector in India for strategic planning at national and international level, the work here attempts to understand the complex array of forces that influence the level and behavior of agricultural products. The division also endeavors to further advance the knowledge in economic and statistical analysis techniques pertinent to research work and to assess technologies, programs and policies to make informed judgments about the trade-offs in allocating scarce resources, predicting resulting changes or their economic consequences. The division harnesses the emerging tools, techniques and research methods in econometrics and statistics to provide direction in designing policies & program, developing institutional mechanisms and facilitating decision-making process of the stakeholders at micro, meso and macro levels.

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    Achievements

    • Performance appraisal of dairy industry in India

    2011-12

    Industrial de-licensing in 1991 led to sharp increase (136%) in the number of dairy plants in the organized sector. Within the organized sector, in terms of number of plants, there was a structural change towards Private Ltd. Companies, but in terms of milk handled, the cooperatives continued to dominate. Milk processing in India is dominated by the unorganised sector, although after 2000-01, there has been a decline in number of unorganised dairy manufacturing units in the country. The own-account manufacturing enterprises, smallest sized units in unorganised sector predominate, but their number and share has been declining over time. The employment growth in the unorganised sector was high, but the real Gross Value Added per enterprise was slow.

    Total factor productivity of organised dairy industry: All India

    The Total Factor Productivity Growth in the organised segment increased at the compound annual rate of 7.18% during 1980/81-2008/09, yet the decadal trends show a slowing down of TFP growth. The states with high TFP growth are, Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh; slow growth in TFP has been estimated in Kerela, Maharashtra, Punjab, and Uttar Pradesh; while in Haryana, Tamil Nadu and West Bengal the TFP growth has been negative. The mean Technical efficiency score worked out to be 0.86, implying that substantial possibility of increasing the output by improvement in efficiency levels exists in the dairy industry. In organised milk processing sector, the growth in real value of output per factory has slowed down drastically from compound annual rate of 8.66% during the 1980s to 1.53% during the 1990s and further to 1.06% in the on-going decade. Post 1990s increase in net value added received a sharp setback during the global economic crisis. Similarly, the real profits that had picked- up after 1999-00 registered a steep decline during global crisis. The growth in labour productivity was positive in the organised sector, but the capital productivity growth was not encouraging due to gross under-utilisation of installed capacity in the dairy plants.

    • Impact assessment

    2015-16

    A field level study analysing the impact of prepared compound cattle feed (CCF) on productivity and profitability of milk production showed that the adoption of CCF was 50-60% in Haryana and Punjab and 60-80% in West Bengal and Odisha. In the northern India, the milk yield of crossbred cows fed with CCF was 16.8% higher than those not fed with the same, while the corresponding percentage was 62% in Eastern India. The adoption of CCF generated an economic surplus of over `44000 million in Eastern India, while in Northern India, due to the unfavourable milk-feed ratio, the technology can generate a positive economic surplus only if there is a decline in feed cost by `3/animal or additional increase in milk yield by 100 grams.

    2016-17

    Semen sexing is a promising technology to deal with the problem of growing number of animals of unwanted sex that are male animals in Indian context. An ex-ante evaluation of the technology was undertaken in Punjab and Haryana, wherein under the alternative animal management scenarios, the quantification of benefit of sexed semen has been done in terms of more milk production due to larger female herd. The net present value of the benefits from semen sexing technology was estimated at `24.10 lakhs per 100 heifers under best management practices. Given the difference in cost of sexed semen and its lower conception rate compared to the unsorted semen, the economic viability is discernible only on the farms that have ideal management practices. The non-viability in case of good and moderate practices gives a clear message that the focus of the Government on promoting sexed semen in India should be backed by efforts to improve estrus detection and conception rate at field level without which there would be no economic rationale for its adoption.

    2017-18

    A comparative analysis of technical efficiency of cooperative member and non- member dairy farms in Gujarat brought out that cooperative member farmers (83.27%) were more efficient than the non-member (75.31%) farmers. The small farmers (81.59%) were most efficient across all herd size. In the case of cooperative non-member farmers, the estimated efficiency score had a negative relation with the herd size. As the size of herd increased, the technical efficiency decreased. The overused resources were green fodder and dry fodder among all the inputs taken into consideration. The technical efficiency of farmers can be significantly improved by providing more access to information, increased non-farm income and promotion of dairy cooperatives. The non-members in the study region preferred to sell milk output to the private sector or directly to the end-users because of remunerative price.

    • Value Chain

    2015-16

    The studies conducted on the compound animal feed value chain in two different dairy production environments in the country, viz. dynamic (Punjab and Haryana) and transient (W.Bengal and Odisha), indicate that each of the six major stakeholder groups in cattle feed value chain, viz., major feed input suppliers, minor input supplier, feed producers, feed marketers, service providers and dairy farmers, require technical and/or policy support to enhance their economic performance. The value addition ranged from `2550-3200/tonne of compound cattle feed in the dynamic region and was higher (`3950-4650/tonne) in the transient region.

    The major weaknesses in the value chain that have to be overcome are, high susceptibility to seasonal price fluctuations, lack of adequate quality control, low responsiveness of milk productivity to feed product under field conditions and inadequate storage facilities. There is

    lack of capacity to use the financial tools to hedge the price risk arising due to high volatility in prices. The key interventions for upgradation, management and development of the cattle feed value chain in the country have been outlined in four major heads: quality assurance and feed safety, maintaining profitability, capacity and skill development and value chain financing.

    The study on value chain of milk and milk products in milk-shed areas of Ballabhgarh and Sirsa milk plants in Haryana, showed that marketed surplus of milk was 76-79 percent of production. The cooperative dairy plants were collecting milk from the farmers, at an average procurement cost of about `1.65/litre and processing them into various value added dairy products. The profit margin was highest in Dahi (>30%) and lowest in paneer (<3%). The milk plants were earning a margin of 9-13% on pasteurized full cream milk (6.1 % Fat and 9.0 % SNF), while the milk producers get a margin of 6-7% on sale of raw milk of same composition, indicating that processing of milk is profitable than the production. The milk producers under the cooperative structure get more than 70% share in the consumers’ rupee, even without adding the additional gains they may get from re-distribution of organizational profits.

    • Enhancing farm income and employment

    2015-16

    In the state of Maharashtra, Western Maharashtra was the most developed region with the highest index value and Vidarbha was the least developed region with the lowest index value over the years. The key regional priorities for balanced development were identified as: i) Focus on increasing milk production by improving livestock support services in Konkan region, ii) In Western Maharashtra feed and fodder is major concern, so focus should be on non conventional feed, balanced ration and for the development of new compound cattle feed industry, iii) Milk marketing is major concern for Khandesh and Marathwada  region, iv) Except grazing area, all other indicators are weak in Vidarbha region, which shows the failure of government schemes, so there is need to have public private partnership  in this region to increase the efficiency of livestock support services which ultimately develop dairy sector and reduce disparity in dairy development.

    In the state of Rajasthan, the issue of balanced regional development was addressed for normative allocation of the investment resources across its agro-climatic zones. For balancing the efficiency, equity and sustainability criterion for livestock development in the state, the top two zones that require ardent policy attention are, Arid Western Plains and Southern Plain and Aravali Hills, where nearly 43% of the resources for livestock development should be invested. The topography of the arid western plain is such that establishing mobile veterinary and health care facilities is needed to cover the vast stretch of the area. The Southern Plain and Aravali Hill region has 44% deficit of feed and fodder resources, which is also reflected in the high yield gap in milk and wool production. The next zone in terms of investment priority, is also from southern part of the state. The region requires instantaneous policy attention to improve livestock productivity through technological advancement, labour productivity by training them in scientific livestock farming practices, and introduction of value-added products for enhancing calorie intake.

    • Dairy inputs and livestock support services

    2017-18

    With the commercialization of dairy farming, demand for green fodder is increasing and farmers are taking up fodder production as a commercial business, which has created a need for effective and efficient marketing system. The study in Haryana estimated overall total cost of cultivation (cost C) for major green fodder crops- sorghum, maize, bajra, and berseem as `49,603/ha; `54,983/ha, `55,672/ha and `56,832/ha, respectively. The overall gross returns for sorghum, maize, bajra, and berseem was found to be `1,06,285/ha; `1,24,207/ha, `1,38,320/ha, and `1,82,139/ha, respectively. The most common problem faced by the farmers and traders was lack of proper market place followed by loss of green fodder by stray animals. Some farmers were also facing problems related to price of output and transportation because of distant location of fodder markets.

    • Demand analysis and price analysis

    2017-18

    Consumption pattern and consumer preferences were studied for fermented probiotic dairy products in metropolitan Delhi. The respondents across all the income groups preferred a probiotic drink worth `22 in container size of 200 ml each available in pack of five at local stores with a health claim of daily immune booster. In case of probiotic dahi, the most preferred attribute combination across all income groups was a product priced at ` 32 available in container size of 400g at milk parlors with a health claim of enhanced digestion.

    Anothe

    • Performance appraisal of dairy industry in India

    2011-12

    Industrial de-licensing in 1991 led to sharp increase (136%) in the number of dairy plants in the organized sector. Within the organized sector, in terms of number of plants, there was a structural change towards Private Ltd. Companies, but in terms of milk handled, the cooperatives continued to dominate. Milk processing in India is dominated by the unorganised sector, although after 2000-01, there has been a decline in number of unorganised dairy manufacturing units in the country. The own-account manufacturing enterprises, smallest sized units in unorganised sector predominate, but their number and share has been declining over time. The employment growth in the unorganised sector was high, but the real Gross Value Added per enterprise was slow.

    Total factor productivity of organised dairy industry: All India

    The Total Factor Productivity Growth in the organised segment increased at the compound annual rate of 7.18% during 1980/81-2008/09, yet the decadal trends show a slowing down of TFP growth. The states with high TFP growth are, Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh; slow growth in TFP has been estimated in Kerela, Maharashtra, Punjab, and Uttar Pradesh; while in Haryana, Tamil Nadu and West Bengal the TFP growth has been negative. The mean Technical efficiency score worked out to be 0.86, implying that substantial possibility of increasing the output by improvement in efficiency levels exists in the dairy industry. In organised milk processing sector, the growth in real value of output per factory has slowed down drastically from compound annual rate of 8.66% during the 1980s to 1.53% during the 1990s and further to 1.06% in the on-going decade. Post 1990s increase in net value added received a sharp setback during the global economic crisis. Similarly, the real profits that had picked- up after 1999-00 registered a steep decline during global crisis. The growth in labour productivity was positive in the organised sector, but the capital productivity growth was not encouraging due to gross under-utilisation of installed capacity in the dairy plants.

    • Impact assessment

    2015-16

    A field level study analysing the impact of prepared compound cattle feed (CCF) on productivity and profitability of milk production showed that the adoption of CCF was 50-60% in Haryana and Punjab and 60-80% in West Bengal and Odisha. In the northern India, the milk yield of crossbred cows fed with CCF was 16.8% higher than those not fed with the same, while the corresponding percentage was 62% in Eastern India. The adoption of CCF generated an economic surplus of over `44000 million in Eastern India, while in Northern India, due to the unfavourable milk-feed ratio, the technology can generate a positive economic surplus only if there is a decline in feed cost by `3/animal or additional increase in milk yield by 100 grams.

    2016-17

    Semen sexing is a promising technology to deal with the problem of growing number of animals of unwanted sex that are male animals in Indian context. An ex-ante evaluation of the technology was undertaken in Punjab and Haryana, wherein under the alternative animal management scenarios, the quantification of benefit of sexed semen has been done in terms of more milk production due to larger female herd. The net present value of the benefits from semen sexing technology was estimated at `24.10 lakhs per 100 heifers under best management practices. Given the difference in cost of sexed semen and its lower conception rate compared to the unsorted semen, the economic viability is discernible only on the farms that have ideal management practices. The non-viability in case of good and moderate practices gives a clear message that the focus of the Government on promoting sexed semen in India should be backed by efforts to improve estrus detection and conception rate at field level without which there would be no economic rationale for its adoption.

    2017-18

    A comparative analysis of technical efficiency of cooperative member and non- member dairy farms in Gujarat brought out that cooperative member farmers (83.27%) were more efficient than the non-member (75.31%) farmers. The small farmers (81.59%) were most efficient across all herd size. In the case of cooperative non-member farmers, the estimated efficiency score had a negative relation with the herd size. As the size of herd increased, the technical efficiency decreased. The overused resources were green fodder and dry fodder among all the inputs taken into consideration. The technical efficiency of farmers can be significantly improved by providing more access to information, increased non-farm income and promotion of dairy cooperatives. The non-members in the study region preferred to sell milk output to the private sector or directly to the end-users because of remunerative price.

    • Value Chain

    2015-16

    The studies conducted on the compound animal feed value chain in two different dairy production environments in the country, viz. dynamic (Punjab and Haryana) and transient (W.Bengal and Odisha), indicate that each of the six major stakeholder groups in cattle feed value chain, viz., major feed input suppliers, minor input supplier, feed producers, feed marketers, service providers and dairy farmers, require technical and/or policy support to enhance their economic performance. The value addition ranged from `2550-3200/tonne of compound cattle feed in the dynamic region and was higher (`3950-4650/tonne) in the transient region.

    The major weaknesses in the value chain that have to be overcome are, high susceptibility to seasonal price fluctuations, lack of adequate quality control, low responsiveness of milk productivity to feed product under field conditions and inadequate storage facilities. There is

    lack of capacity to use the financial tools to hedge the price risk arising due to high volatility in prices. The key interventions for upgradation, management and development of the cattle feed value chain in the country have been outlined in four major heads: quality assurance and feed safety, maintaining profitability, capacity and skill development and value chain financing.

    The study on value chain of milk and milk products in milk-shed areas of Ballabhgarh and Sirsa milk plants in Haryana, showed that marketed surplus of milk was 76-79 percent of production. The cooperative dairy plants were collecting milk from the farmers, at an average procurement cost of about `1.65/litre and processing them into various value added dairy products. The profit margin was highest in Dahi (>30%) and lowest in paneer (<3%). The milk plants were earning a margin of 9-13% on pasteurized full cream milk (6.1 % Fat and 9.0 % SNF), while the milk producers get a margin of 6-7% on sale of raw milk of same composition, indicating that processing of milk is profitable than the production. The milk producers under the cooperative structure get more than 70% share in the consumers’ rupee, even without adding the additional gains they may get from re-distribution of organizational profits.

    • Enhancing farm income and employment

    2015-16

    In the state of Maharashtra, Western Maharashtra was the most developed region with the highest index value and Vidarbha was the least developed region with the lowest index value over the years. The key regional priorities for balanced development were identified as: i) Focus on increasing milk production by improving livestock support services in Konkan region, ii) In Western Maharashtra feed and fodder is major concern, so focus should be on non conventional feed, balanced ration and for the development of new compound cattle feed industry, iii) Milk marketing is major concern for Khandesh and Marathwada  region, iv) Except grazing area, all other indicators are weak in Vidarbha region, which shows the failure of government schemes, so there is need to have public private partnership  in this region to increase the efficiency of livestock support services which ultimately develop dairy sector and reduce disparity in dairy development.

    In the state of Rajasthan, the issue of balanced regional development was addressed for normative allocation of the investment resources across its agro-climatic zones. For balancing the efficiency, equity and sustainability criterion for livestock development in the state, the top two zones that require ardent policy attention are, Arid Western Plains and Southern Plain and Aravali Hills, where nearly 43% of the resources for livestock development should be invested. The topography of the arid western plain is such that establishing mobile veterinary and health care facilities is needed to cover the vast stretch of the area. The Southern Plain and Aravali Hill region has 44% deficit of feed and fodder resources, which is also reflected in the high yield gap in milk and wool production. The next zone in terms of investment priority, is also from southern part of the state. The region requires instantaneous policy attention to improve livestock productivity through technological advancement, labour productivity by training them in scientific livestock farming practices, and introduction of value-added products for enhancing calorie intake.

    • Dairy inputs and livestock support services

    2017-18

    With the commercialization of dairy farming, demand for green fodder is increasing and farmers are taking up fodder production as a commercial business, which has created a need for effective and efficient marketing system. The study in Haryana estimated overall total cost of cultivation (cost C) for major green fodder crops- sorghum, maize, bajra, and berseem as `49,603/ha; `54,983/ha, `55,672/ha and `56,832/ha, respectively. The overall gross returns for sorghum, maize, bajra, and berseem was found to be `1,06,285/ha; `1,24,207/ha, `1,38,320/ha, and `1,82,139/ha, respectively. The most common problem faced by the farmers and traders was lack of proper market place followed by loss of green fodder by stray animals. Some farmers were also facing problems related to price of output and transportation because of distant location of fodder markets.

    • Demand analysis and price analysis

    2017-18

    Consumption pattern and consumer preferences were studied for fermented probiotic dairy products in metropolitan Delhi. The respondents across all the income groups preferred a probiotic drink worth `22 in container size of 200 ml each available in pack of five at local stores with a health claim of daily immune booster. In case of probiotic dahi, the most preferred attribute combination across all income groups was a product priced at ` 32 available in container size of 400g at milk parlors with a health claim of enhanced digestion.

    Another study on consumption pattern analysis for milk and milk products was conducted in Kolkata metropolitan. The consumption of ghee, paneer and butter was found to be among 61.50%, 28.5% and 31% households. Conjoint analysis showed that price contributed to the largest percentage (52.02%) of the preference rating of rasogolla consumers while brand of rasogolla contributed to the percentages (58.35%) of the preferences rating and quantity of ghee had lowest importance (8.5%). Most important attributes for milk to the consumers’ was fat level (40.06%) followed by utilization (36.89%) and quantity (14.66%) of milk.

     2017-18

    During 2005-2016, CAGR of inflation adjusted (real) procurement and retail prices of milk in Karnataka were 1.4% and 3.6 %, respectively, indicating that the rate of growth of procurement prices of milk was not at par with the retail prices of milk. The rise in the real retail prices of milk and curd was 6% to 7 %. The trends in the prices of butter and ghee had more volatility with the CAGR of 3% and 4.1%, respectively. The CAGR of feed was around 6%. The Fodder Price Index was notably higher than the CAGR of procurement prices of milk. Among the various univariate and multivariate candidate models for forecasting the procurement and retail prices of milk, the Vector Auto Regressive with lag period one- VAR (1) model was the most appropriate model. The predictors in the VAR (1) were its own previous year milk prices, previous year values of feed cost and agriculture labour wage

    r study on consumption pattern analysis for milk and milk products was conducted in Kolkata metropolitan. The consumption of ghee, paneer and butter was found to be among 61.50%, 28.5% and 31% households. Conjoint analysis showed that price contributed to the largest percentage (52.02%) of the preference rating of rasogolla consumers while brand of rasogolla contributed to the percentages (58.35%) of the preferences rating and quantity of ghee had lowest importance (8.5%). Most important attributes for milk to the consumers’ was fat level (40.06%) followed by utilization (36.89%) and quantity (14.66%) of milk.

     2017-18

    During 2005-2016, CAGR of inflation adjusted (real) procurement and retail prices of milk in Karnataka were 1.4% and 3.6 %, respectively, indicating that the rate of growth of procurement prices of milk was not at par with the retail prices of milk. The rise in the real retail prices of milk and curd was 6% to 7 %. The trends in the prices of butter and ghee had more volatility with the CAGR of 3% and 4.1%, respectively. The CAGR of feed was around 6%. The Fodder Price Index was notably higher than the CAGR of procurement prices of milk. Among the various univariate and multivariate candidate models for forecasting the procurement and retail prices of milk, the Vector Auto Regressive with lag period one- VAR (1) model was the most appropriate model. The predictors in the VAR (1) were its own previous year milk prices, previous year values of feed cost and agriculture labour wage

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    Courses Offered

    Course Nomenclature Credit Hours
    Ph.D. (Agricultural Economics)
    ES-711 Advanced Econometrics 2+1
    ES-712 Advanced Agricultural Marketing and Price Analysis 2+1
    ES-713 Operations Research 2+1
    ES-721 Advanced Macro-Economic Analysis 2+0
    ES-722 Advanced Production Economics 3+0
    ES-723 Quantitative Development Policy Analysis 1+1
    ES-724 Advanced Micro-Economic Analysis 2+0
    ES-719, ES-729 Seminar 1+0
    M.Sc. (Agricultural Economics)
    ES-611 Micro Economic Theory and Applications 3+0
    ES-612 Agricultural Production Economics 2+1
    ES-613 Linear Programming 1+1
    ES-614 Agricultural Marketing & Price Analysis 2+1
    ES-615 Research Methodology for Social Science 1+1
    ES-616 Mathematics for Agricultural Economics 3+0
    ES-617 Statistical Methods for Social Science 2+1
    ES-621 Micro Economics & Policy 3+0
    ES-622 Agricultural Development Policy Analysis 2+0
    ES-623 Econometrics 2+1
    ES-624 Agricultural Finance & Project Management 2+1
    ES-625 Dairy Business Management 2+1
    ES-626 Natural Resource & Environmental Economics 2+1
    ES-627 Statistics for Industrial Application 3+1
    ES-628 Design of Experiments 3+1
    CS-621 Software Packages for Statistical Computing 2+1
    ES-629 Seminar 1+0
    B.Tech (Dairy Technology)
    ES-111 Economic Analysis 2+0
    ES-312 Advanced Agricultural Marketing and Price Analysis 2+1
    ES-411 Entrepreneurship Development & Industrial Consultancy 2+0
    ES-412 Financial Management & Cost Accounting 2+1
    ES-413 Industrial Statistics 2+1
    CS-111 Computer and Application Software Packages 1+1
    CS-311 ICT in Dairy Industry and Operations Research 2+2

     

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    • Dairy Economics Statistics and Management

    Technologies

    1. Web-enabled user friendly software: Milk Production Economic Analysis Package (MILKEcAP-1.0) was developed for the estimation of economics of milk production of local cattle, crossbred cows and buffaloe The software has three modules for database management pertaining to village level information, complete enumeration of the milch animal stock of the households and the detailed information pertaining to the breeding, feeding, management of animals, quantity and prices of fixed and variable inputs used, as well as output generated in the production process. The software has build-in feature of estimating the fixed and variable cost components on per animal basis.

     

    1. A web based app TEAM-CD (Techno Economic AssessMent-Commercial Dairy farm) was developed for the prospective entrepreneurs of commercial dairy farming using ASP.Net.4.0 as front end and MS-SQL server as back end. It is a decision support system based on the scientific principles of animal husbandry and economics. The software developed is robust to accommodate the regional specificities and user specific requirement in dairy farming. The app provides for generating project report for commercial dairy herd of 10 to 500 adult females. This app has 16 modules, in which 6 are input modules and 10 are output modules. It has a provision for customising the project parameters in accordance with the user requirement. The pre-feasibility project report is generated in the pdf format, giving complete financial analysis of the project for 5 year period including the repayment schedule.

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    • Dairy Economics Statistics and Management

    Alumni

    Name Contact E-mail Affiliation Designation
    A. Anand NDDB
    A.R. Khan 9900550550 aminurk@gmail.com TCS, Banglore Senior Solution Architect

    & Offerings Leader

    A.S. Saini CSKHPKV, Palampur Professor
    Ajmer Singh 9416950249 ajmerskundu@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI, Karnal Principal Scientist
    Amit Kumar Saha 4915213381290 amitsaha@sustainablefoods2050.com IFCN, Germany Senior Dairy Economist
    Amit Kumar Singh 799120470 /

    9956999684

    asingh@tanagerintl.org Country Representative Manager
    Aniketa Horo 7988456279 vandana.horo@gmail.com PAU, Ludhiana PhD Scholar
    Anita Roy Chaudhary 9679284868 Agriculture Department, West Bengal Assistant Director
    Anjani Kumar 9911106918 anjani.kumar@cgiar.org IFPRI, New Delhi Economist
    Ankush Kumar 9418605353 Dept. of Agriculture (Govt. of H.P) AEO
    Anoop M. 9496473795 anoopmangalasseri@gmail.com Institute of Agricultural Sciences, BHU Assistant Professor
    Anupma Dimri 9810162158 anudimrinaryan@gmail.com Coaching Institute, Gurgaon Self Employee
    Arnab Roy 8597864192 royarnab_94@gmail.com UAS Banglore PhD Scholar
    Arobinda Kumar Sarkar NABARD Deputy General Manager
    Arsha Balakrishnan 8289800742 arshab30@gmail.com KAU, Thrissur Assistant Professor

    (Adhoc)

    Arti 8988035004 atartithakur92@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI, Karnal PhD Scholar
    Arun Pandit 9903136521 arun.pandit@icar.gov.in ICAR-Central Inland Fisheries Institute,

    Barrackpore

    Principal Scientist
    Asha Ram Rathore ICAR-NDRI Technical Officer
    Asha Sukumar 8950169149 ash.nibha@gmail.com IARI, New Delhi Scientist
    Ashish Sharma 9621508884 Veterinary Dept. MP Veterinary officer
    Ashok Kumar 9414182063 adagar3@gmail.com ICAR-IISWC, Dehradun Principal Scientist
    Athira NS 854724342 nsaathirans@gmail.com
    Atul Chandra NDDB Deputy Manager
    Atul Sharma State Animal Husbandary Department, MP Veterinary Surgeon
    Avinash Ghule 9034521265 avinashkghule@gmail.com IRMA, Aanad Project Fellow
    B. Dayakar Rao 9963288838 dayakar@millets.res.in IIMR, Hyderabad Principal Scientist
    B. Ganesh Kumar 91-40-

    24581334

    ganesh@naarm.org.in ICAR-NAARM, Hyderabad Principal Scientist
    B.K.Jha 91-11-

    27666364

    brajesh@iegindia.org Institute of Economic Growth, New Delhi Professor
    Babu D. Deceased ICAR-NAARM
    Bharat Singh Deceased ICAR
    Bhupal Singh Deceased ICAR-NDRI Head DESM
    Binita Kumari 8950169196 b.binitakumari@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI, Karnal PhD Scholar
    Biswa Bhaskar Chaoudhry 8950169912 bishwa606@gmail.com PAU, Ludhiana Assiatant Professor
    Biswajit Mondal 8128343861 bisumondal@rediffmail.com ICAR-NRRI, Cuttack Principal Scientist
    Bitan Mondal 9896677149 bitanmondal12@gmail.com Vishwa Bharati University, West Bengal Assistant proffessor
    Bulbul G. Nagrale 7720845922 drbulbul04vet@yahoo.com UDGIR, Maharashtra Assistant professor
    C. Jagan Mohan Rao Vijaya Dairy
    Charta Ram NDDB, Anand
    D.K.Jain 9416009997 dkjn@rediffmail.com ICAR-NDRI, Karnal Principal Scientist (Retd.)
    Darshna Mahida 8930498264 darshnapmahida93@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI, Karnal PhD Scholar
    Debabrata Paul 9862616026 Department of Agriculture (Agartala) Agriculture Officer
    Deepak Shah 9823515479 deepakshah@gipe.ac.in Gokhale Institute of Politics and Econmics,

    Pune

    Professor
    Denny Franco 8950169321 dennyiari@gmail.com IARI, New Delhi Scientist
    Dev Raj Jhajria 941450894 Govt. College, Rajasthan Assistant Professor
    E. Karunanithi 9894422688 karunsbin@yahoo.com Syndicate Bank Agricultral Officer
    G.R.M. Raju CAU, Imphal Dean
    G.S.Gill PAU, Ludhiana
    Gajanan N. Narnaware 9822761798 UDGIR, Maharashtra Assistant Professor
    Ganga Devi 8733070090 gangasaran1982@gmail.com Aanad Agriculture University, Gujrat Assistant Professor
    Gawande Shubham Babanrao 7206044087 shubh.ndri07@yahoo.com Syndicate Bank Branch Manager
    Girdhari Lal Meena 9783913788 glm57@rediffmail.com MPUAT, Udaipur Assistant Professor
    Goutam Das 9813997162 goutam@iifpt.edu.in Indian Institute of food Processing Technology
    Gunjan Bhandari 9034123982 gunjanbhandari5@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI, Karnal Scientist
    Gururaj B. 9686675589 vurguru026@gmail.com ICAR-NIAP, New Delhi SRF
    Gururaj M 8880702238 makrabbig600@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI, (SRS) Banglore PhD Scholar
    Hambarde Pandurang 7722020670 pghambarde@gmail.com Biological E Ltd, Hyderabad Assistant Manager
    Govindrao 9975413658  

     

    Harbir Singh 011-25847501 harbir@iari.res.in IARI, New Delhi Principal Scientist
    Hem Raj Bairwa HDFC Bank Ltd, Ghandinagar
    Himmat Singh HAU, Hisar Professor
    Hubba Lal Singh 9412300342 hlsingh123@gmail.com SVPUAT, Meerut Professor
    Induvala Mathuriya U.P State AHD Veterinary Officer
    J.P.Dhaka Deceased ICAR-NDRI Principal Scientist
    Jagjit Singh ICAR_NDRI Technical Officer
    Jagruti Das 7206967498 jagrutidas178@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI, Karnal PhD Scholar
    Janailin S Papang 7206742441 janai4ndri@gmail.com
    Jayasekhar S. 9961991692 jaysekhars@yahoo.co.in ICAR-CPCRI, Kasargod Senior Scientist
    Jithin J Syndicate Bank, Mathura RDO
    Jui Ray 8257019142 juirayndri@gmail.com Directorate of Agriculture, (Tripura) Agriculture Officer (Marketing &  Statistics)
    K. Chellappan Trivandrum Dairy
    K.B. Vedamurthy 7353237026 vedandri@gmail.com KVAFSU, Bidar Assistant Professor
    K.K.Kalra 9991590138 ICAR-NDRI Principal Scientist
    K.N.S.Sharma Deceased ICAR-NDRI Principal Scientist
    K.R. Rao 9573638000 NANB CGM
    K.S.Kumaraval 9442155624 kriskumaravel@gmail.com PAJANCOA &RI, Pondicherry Assistant Professor
    Kaushik Basu 8800581222 kbasu12@yahoo.co.in YES bank, Kolkatta GEVP
    Kausik Prasun Saha 9406511162 Kousik.Saha@icar.gov.in ICAR-CIAE Bhopal Principal Scientist
    Keshavamurthy S. Central Bank of India Manager
    Kh. Rishikanta Singh 8415929374 rishikanta.ndri@gmail.com ICAR-Research Complex for NEHRegion,  Imphal Scientist
    Khalandar S 9113096382 khalandar25s@gmailcom UHF, Nauni, Himachal Pradesh PhD Scholar
    Khem Chand 7839932709 kcmamnani@gmail.com IGFRI, Jhansi HOD (Agril. Economics)
    Krishna Das 9947075838 drmkrishnadas@gmail.com Arthanomics Research &Consultancy Services Pvt Ltd, Thrissur Agricultural Economist
    Kuldeep Singh Jhajria 9819307318 NABARD, Mumbai Deputy General Manager
    L.L. Michael Khoveio libamiv@gmail.com
    Lachhman Singh ICAR-NDRI Technical Officer
    Laishram Priscilla 7015737210 pcila.econ@gmail.com PAU, Ludhiana Assistant Farm Economist
    Lalringsangpuii Mapuii 8607202552 mapuii_bh@yahoo.com CAU, Imphal Teaching Associate
    Laxmi Dubey 9624252284 laxirani.d@gmail.com SDAU, Gujarat Assistant professor
    Lotan Singh ICAR-NDRI Principal Scientist
    Madhawendra Kumar Thakur 7091288804 ktmadhaw@gmail.com Green Agrimiles, New delhi CEO
    Mahak Malik
    Mahin Sharif 9620478177 sharif.mahin@gmail.com UAS Banglore Assistant professor
    Mangesh G. Manker 7769826600 mangehmankar@gmail.com JP Morgan Chase and Co., Banglore Vice President
    Manik Chandra Pandit Indian Economic Service Deputy Director
    Manjunatha G. 7259005580 manjuagecon@gmail.com Karnataka State Dept of Agriculture Officer
    Massoumeh Nasrollah Zadeh 9996068461 Tabriz University Iran Research Fellow
    Mir Miraj Alli 7377315915 miraj7299@gmail.com (Dept. of Agriculture) Govt. of Odisha Assistant Agriculture

    Officer

    Mukesh Kumar Sinha 9040882106 mukeshwtc@gmail.com ICAR-IIWM, Bhubaneswar Principal Scientist
    Mukesh Sharma Veterinary Dept, Chattisgarh Veterinary Surgeon
    N. Jagan Mohana Rao Vijaya Dairy
    N. Rangaswamy 9828318766 rangas23@yahoo.com NIAM, Jaipur Research Officer
    Nalini Ranjan Kumar 011-25847628 nr.kumar@icar.gov.in ICAR-NIAP, New Delhi Principal Scientist
    Narendra Kumar Singh RAU-Bikaner Professor
    Naveen Prakash Singh 9958650477 Naveen.Singh1@icar.gov.in ICAR-NIAP, New Delhi Principal Scientist
    Nirrangan Handique Assam University
    Nitin Wakchukre 8054401323 ntnwakchukre45@gmail.com GADVASU, Ludhiana Assistant Professor
    P. Anbukkani 011-25847501 anbukkani@iari.res.in IARI, New Delhi Scientist
    P. Lakshmipriya 8074715822 lakshmip.patibandla@gmail.com Agril.Polytechnic college, Podalakur, Andhra

    Pradesh

    Teaching Associate
    P. Murali 948836401 muralisundar007@gmail.com ICAR-Sugarcane Breeding Research Institute, Coimbatore Senior Scientist
    P. Raja Durai 7020782497 niceraja22@gmail.com Indian railway Service
    P. S. Badal 9450592732 badalps@gmail.com Institute of Agricultural Sciences, BHU Prof and Head
    P.K.Dixit 9448755737 drpkdixit@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI (SRS) , Banglore Principal Scientist
    P.M.K. Chand Gandhi 9733309933 pmohandas78@gmail.com Indian Administrative Service District Magistrate and

    Collector

    Pallavi GL 7404597527 pallavilgangur4@gmail.com
    Parlay Hazra 6095532919 Pralayhazra@gmail.com Genpact, New York Data Scientist
    Payal Jaiswal 9898102272 payaljaiswal130@gmail.com IGKV Sknagar PhD Scholar
    Pranajit Bhowmik 9862167210 pranajitbhowmik@yahoo.co.in Tripura Forest Service Forest Officer
    Prem Chand 9425866069 prem3281@gmail.com ICAR-NIAP, New Delhi Scientist (Senior Scale)
    Priya Sharma 9882214569 priyasharma1994j@gmail.com Soil Testing lab, Chamba, Himachal Pradesh Agriculture Officer
    Priyabrata Chakraborty priyodolon@rediffmail.com Animal Resources Development Dept., Govt of West Bengal Assistant Director
    Priyanka Lal 7873073654 priyanka.lal6@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI, Karnal PhD Scholar
    Priyanka Singh 9540100437 89singhpriyanka@gmail.com PAU, Ludhiana PhD Scholar
    Pushpa Yadav 8059950498 pushpayadav@jau.in JAU, Gujarat Assistant professor
    R. Prabhakaran TANUVAS Vice Chancellor
    R.L.Shiyani 9427228486 rlshiyani@yahoo.com JAU, Gujarat Professor & Former

    Registrar

    R.S. Malhan 09417153585 esa@hry.nic.in DESA (Haryana Government) Director
    R.S.Srivastava srivastav_rs@yahoo.co.in ICAR-CIFRI, Allahabad Head
    Rachit Vishnoi Department of Animal Husbandry, Uttarakhand Veterinary Doctor
    Raj Kumar Yogi 8521807288 yogindri@gmail.com ICAR-IINRG, Ranchi Scientist
    Rajesh Kumar 9334880661 rajeshndri@gmail.com,

    infoagri.co.bihar@gmail.com

    Dept of Agriculture, Bihar Assistant Director
    Rajiv Siwach rajiv.siwach (Skype) NABARD General Manager
    Rakesh B 7988456279 rakeshbasavraj@gmail.com State Govt of Karnataka Agriculture Officer
    Ram Lakhan Bairwa 8950797309 PNB, Newai, Rajasthan Agriculture Officer
    Ram Pravesh Singh Birsa Agriculture University, Ranchi Dean
    Rambir Singh Pundir 9429252540 rspundir@aau.in AAU, Gujarat Head, ABM
    Ranjit Kumar 9618740980 ranjit.iari@gmail.com/

    ranjitkumar@naarm.org.in

    ICAR-NAARM, Hyderabad Principal Scientist
    Rapolu Harika Devi 1 (520)

    903-4045

    agrico.ndri@gmail.com Southern Illinois University PhD Scholar
    Ravishankara K.M. 9845471001 ravishankar32.km@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI SRF
    Ripi Doni 9996988215 ripidoni14@gmail.com IARI, New Delhi PhD Scholar
    Rudra Dutta Yadav 9455895574 Department of agriculture, UP Assistant
    S. Ravindran RBI
    S. S. Ahlawat Govt. of Haryana
    S. Vijayalakshmi ICAR-NDRI Principal Scientist
    S.M. Feroze 9612950579 ferozendri@gmail.com Central Agricultural University, Umiam,

    Meghalaya

    Assistant Professor
    Sahabuddin Jalali 93744363858 jalali_161@yahoo.com Agriculture Dept. Afghanistan Agriculture Officer
    Sai Prasad 7795483634 saiprasad.dr@gmail.com Neospark drugs and chemicals, Banglore Technical Manager
    Sammu Kumar 8894672091 52sammu@gmail.com Central Bank of India Haroli, Una Agriculture Officer
    Sampath Bhakthavatsalam 9492692254 sampu.apr13@gmail.com Food Corporation of India, Mysuru Manager (QC)
    Sandeep Kumar Sharma 8269999840 Veterinary Department, MP Veterinary Surgeon
    Sandip Dass Agriculture Marketing Dept. West Bengal Deputy Director
    Sanjay Gandhi N. 9445960878 sanjaygandhi@gmail.com Indian Revenue Officer
    Sanjay Kumar 9412565510 sanjay@ivri.res.in ICAR-IVRI Head
    Sarvana Kumar 9442267934 sharanuk2@gmail.com TNAU, Coimbatore Associate Professor
    Sarvesh Kumar 9312463961 sarveshndri@gmail.com NDDB Deputy Manager
    Satbir Singh 9870997252 UP State Govt.
    Shahnawaz Ahmad Rather 9906759118 Jammu & Kashmir Bank, Shrinagar, J&K Officer
    Shalender Kumar 9989807521 shalanderkumar@gmail.com ICRISAT, Hyderabad Scientist
    Sheela Kharakwal 8928972343 Kharakwal.sheela@gmail.com SKNAU, Bharatpur Assistant Professor
    Shibasish Baral 8950169382 shibashish.baral@gmail.com OPSC Administrative officer
    Shiv Raj Singh 7698977237 shivagritech2007@gmail.com SDAU, Gujarat Assistant professor
    Shweta Bijla 9896027378 shwetabijla00@gmail.com ICAR-NDRI, Karnal PhD Scholar
    Shyam Prakash Singh 8017501429 shyamsingh7296@gmail.com BCKV, Kolkata Completed Ph.D.
    Snehangshu Goswami 8697285528 snehangshugoswami@gmail.com National Cooperative Development Corporation Regional Director
    Soumitra Chowdhury 098373 66996 GIC, Mumbai Assistant manager
    Soumitra Singha Roy LIC Development Officer
    Sri Bhagwan Das
    Subhash Chand 7503203364 s.chand@icar.gov.in ICAR-NIAP, New Delhi Principal Scientist
    Subikash Behera 8249146117 behera.subikash@gmail.com Bank of Baroda Agriculture Field Officer
    Subramanian M. 13053367385 manian.mc@gmail.com JP Morgan Chase Columbus, OH Vice President
    Sumit Mahajan 7389812477 sumitzyne2009@gmail.com Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinery & Assistant Professor
    Sunil Kumar 9582851166 Animal Sciences, Hisar
    Sunil Kumar Singh 8871112828 IGKV, Chattisgarh Assistant Professor
    Sunil V.R. 9582851166 sunilvrndri@gmail.com Canara Bank Agriculture Field Officer
    Sushila Vishnoi 9680250816 DENA Bank, New Delhi Agriculture officer
    Swarn Lata 98155454967 swarn_arya@yahoo.com ICAR- IISWC, Chandigarh Principal Scientist
    T. Ramesh 14159176281 thangavel.ramesh@gmail.com Pharmac Analytic Solutions Consultant
    T.P.Gangadharan NABARD
    T.R.Rajarajan 9886613194 rajanndri77@gmail.com Accenture Lead Data Scientist
    Tara Chand Duhan HIRD
    Uma Mageswari 8951877352 umandri2011@gmail.com Indian Institute of Plantation Management, Banglore Research Associate
    Usha Rani 91-11-

    25847628

    ur.ahuja@icar.gov.in /

    Ushaahuja58@gmail.com

    ICAR-NIAP, New Delhi Principal Scientist
    V. M. Rao VAMNICOM, Pune Professor
    V.K. Arora Deceased ICAR-NDRI Principal Scientist
    V.K.Kesavan ICAR-NDRI Scientist
    Vandana Singh State Animal Husbandary Department, MP Veterinary officer
    Vanishree M 7204922003 vaniveena@gmail.com
    Vasundhara Awasthi 8988035004 vasundhra93pawasthi@gmail.com Oriental Bank of Commerce, Kangra, Himachal Pradesh Agriculture Officer
    Vijay Paul Sharma 7966324819 vijays@iima.ac.in CACP, GOI Chairman
    Vinita Kanwal 8950983603 vinitakanwal888@gmail.com ICAR-NIAP, New Delhi Research Associate
    Vinod Desai 8888853626 vinod.econ@gmail.com Barclays Technology Centre India, Pune Senior Developer
    Vinod Kumar 9428543865 NABARD, Mumbai Deputy General Manager
    Vishal Thorat 8469552697 vishal.lotus@gmail.com/

    vishalthorat@nau.in

    NAU, Gujarat Assistant Professor
    Y.V.R. Reddy ICAR-NDRI